FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 14th through 21st 2019

FOD Saying of the Day

Let’s Make Vail Great Again.  Let’s build a wall and make Aspen pay for it!  – President of Vail

 

FOD Trivia Question of the Day

When the earth, sun and moon are in “quadrature” (at right angles to each other with the earth at the apex), the gravitational forces generated on the oceans’ tides are the weakest.  What is this least powerful, lowest range tide called?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

On a 25 mile bike ride, the front wheel will actually travel farther than the rear wheel.  Why?  Answer – Because the front wheel turns on the outside of the radius of turn of the bike overall and the rear wheel then tracks the more direct turning path.

 

FOD Shutdown

The entire staff of FOD remains unpaid, but events continue to transpire worthy of our consideration, speculation, commentary and appreciation.  FOD is the first description of history.  But sometimes you have to go skiing.  There are lots of events to cover.

 

 

Vail, The 10th Mountain Division and The President of Vail

I’ve been skiing at Vail this last week courtesy of Friend of FOD Taco.  Thanks Taco.  It was great!  Vail is a Home Rule Municipality in Eagle CountyColorado, United States. The population of the town was 5,305 in 2010.  The town, home to Vail Ski Resort, is the largest ski mountain in Colorado.  Vail was incorporated in 1966, four years after the opening of Vail Ski Resort. The ski area was founded by Pete Seibert and local rancher Earl Eaton in 1962, at the base of Vail Pass. The pass was named after Charles Vail, the highway engineer who routed U.S. Highway 6 through the Eagle Valley in 1940, which eventually became Interstate 70. Seibert, a New England native, served in the U.S. Army’s 10th Mountain Division during World War II, which trained at Camp Hale, 14 miles south of Vail between Red Cliff and Leadville. He was wounded in Italy at the Battle of Riva Ridge but went on to become a professional skier after he recovered. Seibert, with other former members of the 10th Mountain Division, returned to Colorado after World War II with the intention of opening a ski resort. Some background: In November 1939, after the Soviet Union‘s invasion of Finland, where Russian efforts were frustrated following the destruction of two armored divisions by Finnish soldiers on skis.  The conflict caught global attention as the outnumbered and outgunned Finnish soldiers were able to use the difficult local terrain to their advantage severely hampering the Soviet attacks and embarrassing the Soviet military.  Upon seeing the effectiveness of these troops, Charles Minot Dole, the president of the National Ski Patrol, began to lobby the War Department emphasizing the need for a similar unit of troops in the United States Army, trained for fighting in winter and mountain warfare. In September 1940, Dole was able to present his case to General George Marshall, the U.S. Army Chief of Staff, who agreed with Dole’s assessment, deciding to create a “Mountain” unit for fighting in harsh terrain. The U.S. Army authorized the formation of the platoon sized Army Ski Patrol in November 1940.  The 10th Mountain Division was awarded two campaign streamers in World War II, and since one campaign streamer for Somalia, and four campaign streamers in the War on Terrorism for a total of seven campaign streamers and three unit decorations in its operational history.   Vail Mountain rises from 8,120 feet to 11,570 feet, giving a vertical rise of 3,450 feet.  It has a 5,289 acres skiable area, 33 ski lifts, and 193 marked skiing trails on three faces: the front side, the back bowls, and Blue Sky Basin (a great new addition). The seven back bowls are Sun Down Bowl, Sun Up Bowl, Teacup Bowl, China Bowl, Siberia Bowl, Inner Mongolia Bowl, and Outer Mongolia Bowl. Blue Sky Basin includes Pete’s Bowl and Earl’s Bowl—to commemorate Pete Seibert and Earl Eaton.  As of late however the President of Vail has been complaining about the influx of ski bums to Vail from Aspen.  He claims they are arriving through the mountains in droves, bringing turmoil to the area.  He has insinuated they may be criminals, rapists, drug dealers and the dregs of society. They come, then they take those ski shop jobs, those restaurant jobs, those little band gigs from the Vail ski bums, and then they take those end seats at the bar when you’re looking for just one more stool.  They bring only four or five credit cards with credit limits of $100K each and expect to be welcomed.  The Vail president says they need to be stopped.  Word has it other groups of ski bums are coming not just from Aspen, but they also coming from Telluride and Taos.  These ski bums must be stopped.  And a wall is the thing that will do it.  He made it a campaign promise.  Let’s Make Vail Great Again.  Let’s Build A Wall and Make Aspen pay for it.  It’s completely unrealistic to assume Aspen with contribute one cent toward such a venture.  The President of Vail has a separate agenda in that he knows if he keeps the issue of ski bums from Aspen in the news, and the city council partially shut down, he knows the focus of the news media will be less likely to concentrate on the ongoing investigation as to whether he colluded with Steam Boat Springs to build to high end hotel and condo project in that city.  Currently the evidence points to the fact that he and his family has been colluding with Steam Boat Springs for years in efforts to enrich his personal accounts and influence.  It remains to be seen if this amoral individual, currently using the unpaid city workers as pones in a struggle with the city council can survive.  More to follow.  Comments welcomed and appreciated.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 14th through 21st 2019”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 10th through 14th 2019

FOD Saying of the Day

It’s only a month until pitchers and catchers report for spring training and it’s time to work on your clichés.  A good friend of mine used to say, “This is a very simple game. You throw the ball, you catch the ball, you hit the ball. Sometimes you win, sometimes you lose, sometimes it rains.” Think about that for a while.”  Ebby Calvin LaLoosh from Bull Durham

 

FOD Trivia Question of the Day

On a 25 mile bike ride, the front wheel will actually travel farther than the rear wheel.  Why?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

By whom and where was the speed of light first calculated to be 299,792.50±0.10 km/s?

Well I thought for sure I would get some comments on this one.  Answer– President Ulysses S. Grant awarded Albert A. Michelson a special appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy in 1869.  During his four years as a midshipman at the Academy, Michelson excelled in optics, heat, climatology and drawing. After graduating in 1873 and two years at sea, he returned to the Naval Academy in 1875 to become an instructor in physics and chemistry.  Michelson was fascinated with the sciences, and the problem of measuring the speed of light in particular. While at Annapolis, he conducted his first experiments of the speed of light, as part of a class demonstration in 1877. His Annapolis experiment was refined, and in 1879, he measured the speed of light in air to be 299,864 ± 51 kilometers per second, and estimated the speed of light in vacuum as 299,940 km/s, or 186,380 mi/s using what became known as the Albert A. Michelson and Edward W. Morley experiment.  In 1907 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics, becoming the first American to win the Nobel Prize in a science.  When you visit the Naval Academy you can see the path light took during his experiment on the walkway adjoining Michelson Hall named in his honor as is a crater on the Moon.   According to special relativityc is the maximum speed at which all conventional matter and hence all known forms of information in the universe can travel. Though this speed is most commonly associated with light, it is in fact the speed at which all massless particles and changes of the associated fields travel in vacuum (including electromagnetic radiation and gravitational waves). Such particles and waves travel at c regardless of the motion of the source or the inertial reference frame of the observer. In the special and general theories of relativityc interrelates space and time, and also appears in the famous equation of mass–energy equivalence E = mc2

 

  Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 10th through 14th 2019”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 5th through 9th 2019

FOD Saying of the Day

Political ability is the ability to foretell what is going to happen tomorrow, next week, next month and next year.  And to have the ability afterwards to explain why it didn’t happen. – Winston Churchill
FOD Trivia Question of the Day

By whom and where was the speed of light first calculated to be 299,792.50±0.10 km/s?

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

What was the first movie made in Cinemascope?  Answer – The Robe is a 1953 American Biblical epic film that tells the story of a Roman military tribune who commands the unit that is responsible for the Crucifixion of Jesus. The film was released by 20th Century Fox and was the first film released in the widescreen process CinemaScope.

 

Government Is Shutdown But Not FOD

The partial Government shutdown continues.  President Trump walked out of a meeting on 09 January after refusing to backdown on his demand for a wall.  He hasn’t learned he doesn’t hold the winning hand on this issue and I think Republicans will begin to waiver in their support after Friday when Government workers will not receive a paycheck.  FOD is not closed however and there’s a lot to cover these days.  FOD never closes, except to go skiing, or vacation, or work on the ’31 Chevy.

 

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 5th through 9th 2019”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 1st through 4th 2019

FOD Saying of the Day

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something. –  Neil Gaiman

FOD Trivia Question of the Day

What was the first movie made in Cinemascope?

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

There was no trivia question in the last edition.  The question is however, have you forwarded FOD to two friends as part of your New Year’s resolutions.

 

Happy New Year

In 45 B.C. New Year’s Day was celebrated on January 1st for the first time as the Julian calendar takes effect.  Roman dictator, Julius Caesar designed a new calendar based upon solar year developed by the Egyptians and calculated the solar year to be 365 ¼ days and decreed a day be added every four years in February so as to keep the calendar from falling out of step.  However their calculations were a bit off as Caesar’s s astronomer Sosigenes failed to calculate the correct value of the solar year as 365.242199 days and not 365.25 days.  Likely they used the wrong app for that.  The 11-minute/year error added seven days by the year 1000 and 10 more days by the mid-15th century.  In 1570, Pope Gregory XIII omitted 10 days in 1582, institutionalized leap year, and thus implementing the Gregorian calendar.  And they didn’t have the US Naval Observatory to give them a good time hack.  See article below.

Did You Sing Auld Lang Syne On New Year’s Eve?

“Auld Lang Syne” is a Scots-language poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song. It is well known in many countries, especially in the English-speaking world, its traditional use being to bid farewell to the old year at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve. By extension, it is also sung at funerals, graduations, and as a farewell or ending to other occasions. The international Scouting movement in many countries uses it to close jamborees and other functions.   But I still don’t know why they incorporated the song into the finale of the classic Christmas film “It’s A Wonderful Life” other than it’s the end of the movie.  The poem’s Scots title may be translated into standard English as “old long since” or, more idiomatically, “long long ago”, “days gone by”, or “old times”. Consequently, “For auld lang syne”, as it appears in the first line of the chorus, might be loosely translated as “for the sake of old times”.  The phrase “Auld Lang Syne” is also used in similar poems by Robert Ayton (1570–1638), Allan Ramsay (1686–1757), and James Watson (1711), as well as older folk songs predating Burns.  Matthew Fitt uses the phrase “in the days of auld lang syne” as the equivalent of “once upon a time” in his retelling of fairy tales in the Scots language.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 1st through 4th 2019”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day December 28th through 31st 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes. Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something. –  Neil Gaiman

FOD Trivia Question of the Day

No question today, just some trivia.  Throughout the year, visitors to Times Square in New York City write their New Year’s wishes on pieces of official Times Square New Year’s Eve confetti. At the end of the year, the wishes are collected and added to the one ton of confetti that showers the crowd gathered in Times Square in celebration of the New Year.

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

What was the first secret message Ralphie from A Christmas Story decoded using his newly acquired Little Orphan Annie secret decoder ring?  Answer – BE SURE TO DRINK YOUR OVALTINE.

 

Friends of FOD New Year’s Resolution

Add these to your list of resolutions:

Send FOD to two friends and ask them to subscribe.

Send two comments per month regarding FOD.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day December 28th through 31st 2018”