FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 23rd through 27th 2018

Saying of the Day

English is tough.  It can be understood through tough, thorough thought though.  Maybe I need another scotch in order to have a better saying of the day.  Try to work it into a discussion today.

 

There’s no baseball being played, but lots of baseball news

 

Chipper Jones, Vladimir Guerrero, Jim Thome and Trevor Hoffman Elected To Hall of Fame

VOTED IN: 3B Chipper Jones

Teams: Braves

Length of career: 19 years

Career stats: .303 BA, 468 HR, 1,623 RBI, 150 SB, 2,499 G, .455 OBP, .930 OPS

Career WAR: 85, via Baseball Reference

Ballot percentage:  92.2

Years on ballot: 1

What you should know: Real first name is Larry … got the nickname “Chipper” from being like his father, or a “chip off the old block” … 1995 World Series winner … 1999 NL MVP, 8-time All-Star … 2 Silver Sluggers …1995 NL Rookie of the Year runner-up … Braves retired his No. 10 … first pick of the 1990 draft … is the Braves’ all-time leader in hits and RBI … hit better than .300 from each side of the plate … Only switch-hitter with a career .300 BA and 400 or more home runs.

 

VOTED IN: OF Vladimir Guerrero

Teams: Expos, Angels, Rangers, Orioles

Length of career: 16 years

Career stats: .318 BA, 449 HR, 1,496 RBI, 181 SB, 2,147 G, .379 OBP, .931 OPS

Career WAR: 59.3, via Baseball Reference

Ballot percentage: 92.9

Years on ballot: 2

What you should know:  Appeared on 71.7 percent of ballots last year … 2004 AL MVP … nine-time All-Star … eight-time Silver Slugger winner … retired as the all-time leader in hits among players from the Dominican Republic, but was passed by Adrien Beltre in 2014 … helped Angels win five AL West titles … retired as an Angel when he signed a one-day contract with them … is the first Angels player in the Hall of Fame … six top-10 MVP vote finishes … has eight siblings … has eight children

 

VOTED IN: 1B/DH Jim Thome

Teams: Indians, Phillies, White Sox, Twins, Dodgers, Orioles

Length of career: 22 years

Career stats: .276 BA, 1,699 RBI, 612 HR, 2,543 AB, .402 OBP, .956 OPS

Career WAR: 72.9, via Baseball Reference

Percentage of ballots: 89.8

Years on ballot: 1

What you should know: Just the eighth player to hit 600 home runs … Five-time All-Star … 1 Silver Slugger … 2006 AL Comeback Player of the Year … 2002 Roberto Clemente Award … 2003 NL home run leader … Indians’ Hall of Fame … Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame … two Marvin Miller Man of the Year Awards … a Lou Gehrig Memorial Award … 19th all-time in OPS … 13th round pick in 1989 … two World Series appearances … signed a one-day contract to retire with the Indians in 2014 … has two kids.

 

A good class.

  Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 23rd through 27th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 19th through 22 2018

FOD Staff Vote To Reopen But Only Temporarily

As many of you realize the entire FOD staff was forced to close down last Friday when staff members could not agree upon how to extend the existing budget (which was already a continuing resolution) with provisions that would established protection for FOD Dreamers.  FOD Dreamers are those individuals who have influenced members of the FOD staff to address the provisions of DACA and at the same time not make it appear they have caused a FOD shutdown.  This disagreement has tied two differing facets of how to manage the entire structure of FOD.  This has occurred at a time when productivity is on the rise nationwide and despite the fact FOD was shut down; the DJIA along with the other major indices actually increased.  Who saw that coming?  The need to provide for a stable budget (already months late) and simultaneously extend DACA are crucial to the debate at hand.  DACA (Dashingly Aged Carrier Aviators) provisions currently in place are due to expire in March and could affect FOD Dreamers.   As you will recall DACA was established to provide support for those carrier aviators who were curtailed from flying off aircraft carriers against their will by foolish and ill-conceived age restrictions.  Many depend upon the provisions of a stable budget and DACA to pay their bar bills.  Despite the fact many Dreamers, as they are called, have demonstrated leadership skills and accomplishments in other facets of their lives they strongly desire to be brought into the greater population of pub seat occupier’s nationwide.  It seemed like the appropriate time to link this and the continuing budget issues together.  However after three days of FOD being closed (which I might add found the entire FOD staff skiing in Idaho) a crucial vote was taken today that passes yet another continuing resolution for the budget and at the same time guarantees the issues of DACA will be first upon the agenda.  So while the FOD staff has other crucial issues that need to be addressed, i.e. what color to paint the ’31 Chevy, China’s continuing aggression in the South China Sea, where to watch the Super Bowl, and how likely are the North Koreans to hack our Bit Coin accounts, the FOD staff has agreed to take up DACA.  I don’t see any other parallels to these events in the world today.  Who knew this could happen?  In a related manner it was revealed Armed Forces Network, which was shuttered on Saturday after the announcement that FOD (and some other institutions) were closed down, but was partially restored for Sunday’s NFL games.  This despite the fact we can’t depend upon NFL players to respect the flag that defends their right to make a completely outrageous amount of money.  In a statement, Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White said department officials “determined the operational necessity of television and radio broadcasts constitutes them as essential activities.” As a result, two of AFN’s eight channels will remain broadcasting for now.  She did not comment of the two sides’ positions in the FOD staff disputes.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 19th through 22 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 14th through 18th 2018

Saying of the Day

Id est quod id est.   It is what it is, but it sounds a lot smarter in Latin.

 

Five Officers Referred To An Article 32 Hearing

In an extremely rare event, the Navy has decided to charge five officers with negligent homicide for their roles in the two fatal ship collisions, the USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) (being moved aboard MV Treasure below left) and the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62).  In the early morning hours of 17 June 2017, the USS Fitzgerald (also being moved below right) was involved in a collision with the container ship MV ACX Crystal, seriously damaging the destroyer. Seven of Fitzgerald‘s crew were killed. Several others were injured, including her commanding officer, Commander Bryce Benson. The John S. McCain was involved in a collision with the merchant ship Alnic MC on 21 August 2017 off the coast of Singapore, which resulted in the deaths of ten of her crew, and left another five injured. I don’t recall a case in recent Navy history where accident at sea has triggered such criminal charges.  Navy Times is reporting The Navy on Tuesday laid out the charges that would be presented at what is called an Article 32 hearing, which will determine whether the accused will go to trial in a court-martial. No doubt paving the way for the severe charges was the significant loss of life in the two collisions.  “What’s different here is the loss of life,” said Eugene Fidell, an expert in military law who teaches at Yale Law School. “The victims’ families are obviously devastated by this, the Navy obviously feels it has an obligation to them as well to its own standards.”  The Fireball guess would be the cases will end with plea bargains and the officers are more likely to be dismissed from the service, lose their retirement or receive other administrative punishments.  Again according to Navy Times, in one of the few relatively recent similar cases, two Marine officers were tried on charges of negligent homicide and manslaughter for piloting a small twin-engine military plane into a cable holding a gondola in Italy in 1998. The wing of the twin-engine Prowler was flying too low when it sliced through the cable, sending 20 civilians in the cable car plummeting to their deaths. The two officers were found not guilty of those charges, but were later found guilty of obstruction of justice for destroying a video taken during the flight.  (There were a number of issues in this case which certainly warranted dismissal of the charges).  Commanders involved in other ship collisions have largely avoided any type of homicide or manslaughter charges.  In the case of the Ehime Maru and USS Greeneville collision on 9 February 2001, Greenville (SSN-772) conducting an emergency main ballast tank blow off the coast of Oahu while hosting several civilian “distinguished visitors”, mainly donors to the Battleship Missouri Memorial, the Greeneville struck the 191-foot (58 m) Japanese fishery high school training ship Ehime Maru (えひめ丸), causing the fishing boat to sink in less than ten minutes with the death of nine crew members, including four high school students.  The commander of the Greeneville, Commander Scott Waddle, accepted full responsibility for the incident. However, after he faced a court of inquiry, it was decided a full court-martial would be unnecessary and Commander Waddle’s request to retire was approved for 1 October 2001 with an honorable discharge.  The Navy said Wednesday that preliminary hearings for the five officers charged in the Fitzgerald and McCain collisions will likely be held in the coming weeks in the Washington, D.C., region, but exact locations and dates are not set yet. The hearing officer will decide whether there is enough evidence for the cases will go to a trial by court-martial and what specific charges will be brought against the officers, based on that evidence.  The maximum punishment for negligent homicide is three years in prison and dismissal from the Navy. For a conviction on that charge, Fidell said, prosecutors must prove the officer was guilty of “simple negligence” that resulted in the deaths.  In addition to the negligent homicide charge, several officers are also facing charges of dereliction of duty and endangering a ship. The maximum punishment for the dereliction of duty charge is three months in jail, and the maximum punishment for endangering a vessel is two years in jail.  The Navy conducted a series of investigations and reviews into the two collisions, concluding that the accidents were the result of poor judgment, bad decision-making and widespread training and leadership failures by the commanders and crew who didn’t quickly recognize and respond to unfolding emergencies.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 14th through 18th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 9th through 13th 2018

Saying Of The Day

Hyphenated.  Non-hyphenated.  Now that’s irony.

 

SpaceX Mission Fails

SpaceX has for months been preparing for the launch of a highly classified payload launch, presumed to be a spy satellite code named Zuma.  This past Sunday the launch did take place using a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.  There are multiple reports out there.  SpaceX announced January 9th their portion of the launch event was totally successful.  But a story in the Wall Street Journal reported the satellite is presumed a total loss after it failed to reach low-earth orbit.  Lawmakers and Congressional staffers from the Senate and the House were briefed regarding the mission’s failure.  In a follow up article Matt Desch, chief executive officer of satellite operator Iridium Communications Inc., said that as the launch contractor, Northrop Grumman deserves the blame for the loss last weekend of the satellite, which is presumed to have crashed into the ocean.  And I’m sure there will be additional Congressional inquiries this next week.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 9th through 13th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 5th through 8th 2018

Bama Beats Georgia

In a great national championship college football game that saw an amazing group of freshmen players on both sides, Alabama beat Georgia 26-23 in overtime.  And Mayhem is back!  The New Year’s resolution of the kinder, gentler, Mayhem didn’t even last two weeks…..

 

US Suspends Security Assistance to Pakistan

The relationship between the US and Pakistan has long been a complicated one.  The protracted 17 year war in Afghanistan has made us strained allies in the war against terrorism.  Defense Times is reporting the decision by the U.S. to suspend security assistance to Pakistan could have serious consequences for the American-led fight in Afghanistan, and potentially further strengthen ties between Islamabad and China.  As you’ll recall China is spending big money in Pakistan to develop and build the new silk road.  Our need to encourage Pakistan to assist the US conflicts with the government of Pakistan’s generally reluctance to put pressure on the tribal forces in Afghanistan they identify with more closely than those of western cultures.  Then there was that whole deal of allowing Osama bin Laden to hind in and flourish in Pakistan.  And it’s important to note that as we withdraw our influence or in this case money from the region, China is there to fill the gap.  Spokesperson for the United States Department of State Heather Nauert announced new restrictions on Thursday that cover security assistance above and beyond the $255 million for Pakistani purchases of American military equipment that the administration held up in August, but it was not immediately clear how much money and materiel was being withheld.  Nauert made clear the $255 million was still blocked. The new action targets payments of so-called Coalition Support Funds that the U.S. pays to Pakistan to reimburse it for its counterterrorism operations. Those funds are typically paid later in the year, and already require U.S. certification, so the effect of Thursday’s announcement was unclear.  The move comes days after President Donald Trump’s New Year’s Day tweet that accused Pakistan of playing U.S. leaders for “fools,” as well as a growing number of voices from the administration that have complained Pakistan is not doing enough to combat militants targeting U.S. personnel in neighboring Afghanistan.  On Monday, Trump said the U.S. had “foolishly” given Pakistan more than $33 billion in aid in the last 15 years and had gotten nothing in return but “lies & deceit.” He reiterated longstanding allegations that Pakistan gives “safe haven to the terrorists we hunt in Afghanistan.”  The big question facing the American effort in Afghanistan now becomes whether Pakistan retaliates by shutting down the supply lines for materiel into Afghanistan, known as the Ground Lines of Communication, or GLOC.  Hours before the announcement,  United States Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis was asked if there were any signals from Pakistan that cutting the aid would result in the GLOC being closed, to which he responded, “We have had no indication of anything like that.”  But closing the GLOC remains a long-standing concern for the U.S. Those lines represent the cheapest way of getting supplies to U.S. forces in Afghanistan, something the Pentagon learned the hard way between Nov. 2011 and July 2012, when Pakistan shut the GLOC routes down following an incident where 24 Pakistani soldiers were killed by NATO forces along the Afghanistan-Pakistan border.  Reporting in 2012 revealed that costs for getting needed supplies into Afghanistan went from $17 million a month to $104 million a month, a significant upcharge even by Pentagon budget standards. With significantly fewer troops in Afghanistan today than in 2012, the costs would not be quite so high, but could still hurt a Department of Defense that finds itself lacking budget stability.  Pakistan has for years tried to counterbalance its alliance with the U.S. with one from China, including with its military relationships. Industrially, Pakistan has agreed to work with China to produce a new submarine fleet as well as working together to develop what in Pakistan is known as the JF-17 jet fighter. In addition, China has developed the Azmat-class missile boat for Pakistan, which will carry Chinese-built weapons.  Notably, a Pentagon report from last June concluded that China will seek to develop a military base in Pakistan, which would represent only the second People’s Liberation Army military facility outside of China.  In an off-camera briefing with reporters on Friday, Mattis took a more conciliatory approach. He acknowledged Pakistan’s anti-terrorism efforts and emphasized that aid would be restored if the U.S. sees evidence of renewed effort by Pakistan.  So I’d say Pakistan has some choices to make.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day January 5th through 8th 2018”