FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day May 31st through June 4th 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

Life always offers you a second chance. It’s called tomorrow.

 

INDOPACOM Is The New US Pacific Command

In a move that has been coming for awhile, the US Pacific Command is being renamed.  Military Times reports Defense Secretary Jim Mattis announced Wednesday that U.S. Pacific Command would now be called  U.S. Indo-Pacific Command , in the latest move to counter Chinese economic and military pressure in the region.  Mattis said he directed the name change in recognition that “all nations large and small are essential to the region, in order to sustain stability in ocean areas critical to global peace.”  Mattis made the remarks at the change of command ceremony in Pearl Harbor for incoming INDOPACOM Commander ADM Philip S. Davidson (USNA ’82).  “In recognition of the increasing connectivity of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, today we rename the U.S. Pacific Command to U.S.-Indo Pacific Command,” Mattis said.  While Mattis stressed that the change was not meant to be combative, it did signal America’s commitment to ensure that every country “no matter its size …. [is] not bound by any nation’s predatory economics or threat of coercion.”  However, outgoing commander of the former U.S. Pacific Command, Navy ADM Harry B. Harris Jr., was more direct in his assessment of China’s impact on the region.  “Great power competition is back,” Harris said. “I believe we are reaching an inflection point in history…. A geo-political competition between free and oppressive visions is taking place in the Indo-Pacific.”  INDOPACOM is a unified combatant command of the United States Armed Forces responsible for the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. It is the oldest and largest of the unified combatant commands. Its commander, the senior U.S. military officer in the Pacific, is responsible for military operations in an area which encompasses more than 100 million square miles (260,000,000 km2), or roughly 52 percent of the Earth’s surface, stretching from the waters off the west coast of the United States to the west coast of India, and from the Arctic to the Antarctic. The Commander reports to the President of the United States through the Secretary of Defense and is supported by Service component and subordinate unified commands, including U.S. Army PacificU.S. Pacific FleetU.S. Pacific Air Forces, U.S. Marine Forces PacificU.S. Forces JapanU.S. Forces KoreaSpecial Operations Command Korea, and Special Operations Command Pacific. USINDOPACOM also has two direct reporting units (DRUs) – U.S. Pacific Command Joint Intelligence Operations Center (JIOC) and the Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance (CFE-DMHA) as well as a Standing Joint Task Force, Joint Interagency Task Force West (JIATF-W). The USINDOPACOM headquarters building, the Nimitz-MacArthur Pacific Command Center, is located on Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii.

 

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day May 31st through June 4th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 4th thorough 7th 2017

Additional Sanctions Imposed on North Korea

The UN Security Council is credited with imposing ‘tough new’ economic sanctions on North Korea.  Good.  It’s also important to note the Security Council was unanimous in approving these sanctions including support from both China and Russia.  United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson currently at the ASEAN summit in the Philippines indicated, “The best signal that North Korea could give us that they’re prepared to talk would be to stop these missile launches. Those sanctions; they will take time to have an impact. Secretary Tillerson said the US will be monitoring implementation of the sanctions to ensure they are enforced by all countries.  Will they at last bring Pyongyang to the realization that a nuclear ICBM capable will not be tolerated?  I doubt it.  In the 25 through 27 July edition of FOD, I noted I don’t believe Kim Jong Un will be persuaded, as he is still able to control all aspects of his government’s supply and demand systems.

He allowed his people to suffer widespread famine and all previous attempts to isolate he and his “family business” government have neither deterred nor abated the progress of his nuclear development program.  For him, this is just more of the same and he can point to outside nations as responsible for his people’s further hardships.  The only way he will discuss any change of direction of his nuclear program is if he is assured regime change and the reunification of the Korean peninsula is somehow not a long term goal.  Then of course we would be supporting another dictator with an abysmal record on human rights.  What you think Friends of FOD?

 

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 4th thorough 7th 2017”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day June 03 through 05, 2017

Grand Slam Record

On Saturday there were 7 grand slams hit in Major League Baseball.  That has never happened in the history of the game.  Albert Pujols joined the 600-home run club on Saturday night, and he did it in a way that’s never been done before: via a spectacular, 363-foot grand slam.  The Angels’ 37-year-old slugger delivered his record-setting blast in the fourth inning of Saturday’s game against the Twins, skying a pitch from Ervin Santana into the left field bleachers. No one begrudged him the long moment he took to admire the ball as it drifted back over the wall. It was a moment he — along with an estimated 40,236 Angels fans — deserved to savor.

 

 

Global Allies Call For Continued FON Ops in South China Sea

Defense News reports, speakers at an Asian security summit have called for a continuation of U.S. Navy freedom of navigation (FON) patrols in the South China Sea, with the dispute still on participants’ minds even as other regional security challenges have made the news in recent weeks. In their respective speeches, the defense ministers of Australia and Japan have supported U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis’ assertion that the U.S. military will continue to operate in spaces allowed by international law in their respective speeches at the annual Shangri La Dialogue in Singapore.  Organized by the International Institute of Strategic Studies or IISS (Asia), the event brings together government and non-governmental defense and security professionals from Asia and around the world to discuss regional events, and is the biggest such summit in the region.   In his speech at the first plenary session on Saturday, Mattis said the U.S. military , “We will continue to fly, sail, and operate wherever international law allows and demonstrate resolve through operational presence in the South China Sea and beyond,” adding that “our operations throughout the region are an expression of our willingness to defend both our interests and the freedoms enshrined in international law.”

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day June 03 through 05, 2017”