FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day July 16 through 20 2017 An Overlap Edition

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer Resigns

Sean Spicer, one of the best-known faces of the Trump administration has submitted his resignation as Press Secretary.  His departure came shortly before President Donald Trump named Anthony Scaramucci, a transition official in the Trump campaign and longtime Wall Street financier, as named White House communications directorSarah Huckabee Sanders, has been promoted to press secretary. Scaramucci (left) is not a communications or media professional, but rather a Wall Street businessman.  The real question is will Saturday Night Live be able to put together a Spicy skit with Melissa McCarthy.

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FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day May 19th through 23rd, 2017

Friends of FOD

I got a little behind in getting out the last edition, so now it’s all combined into one edition.  Enjoy, comment, write your Congressmen!

 

Trump Budget Rant

Yesterday, May 22, the White House officially unveiled its 2018 budget.  The Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said that the president is making good on his vow to save Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security, among other things, and said that they are not kicking anyone off who needs the programs.  Yet deep cuts to programs would indicate otherwise.  Trump’s budget would cut Medicaid by a lot, despite the president telling the Daily Signal days before launching his White House bid, “I’m not going to cut Social Security like every other Republican and I’m not going to cut Medicare or Medicaid.”  The administration proposes reducing spending on Medicaid programs by more than $600 billion over the next decade, a massive cut that appears to go on top of $839 billion in Medicaid cuts included in the House health care bill Trump is supporting.  Trump’s budget proposes slashing the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), a $31.4 billion change to the program that pays monthly benefits to over 10 million disabled individuals under the retirement age. Barring the kind of hyperbolic growth Trump has promised and economists have disputed, Trump’s budget would do little to combat the national debt. Rather, it would potentially increase it.  For us veterans, the proposed budget decreases cost-of-living adjustments for veterans benefits payouts and eliminating those adjustments for some federal civilian retirees altogether.  The White House plan would extend the practice of rounding down veterans payouts to the nearest whole dollar, trimming a few cents off our checks. Trump’s plan calls for eliminating annual cost-of-living increases Federal Employee Retirement System enrollees completely, and lowering the adjustments for Civil Service Retirement System enrollees by 0.5 percent.  And while those Navy “Crabs” (Side Moving Beach Creatures) or Civil Servants are not always held in the best of regards, this would be represent substantial reductions in payouts for the estimated 70,000 federal retirees each year, along with the hundreds of thousands more already collecting their pensions. CSRS beneficiaries are not eligible for Social Security payments. FERS employees are, but those government pensions still make up a significant portion of their retirement income.  Trump’s budget was declared dead on arrival.  But then again I can think of a Presidential budget that wasn’t considered dead on arrival.

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