FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day November 20th through 22nd, 2017

Friends of FOD – Happy Thanksgiving

 

COD Aircraft Crashes in Philippine Sea

A U.S. Navy C-2 Greyhound engaged in Carrier Onboard Delivery aircraft carrying 11 people crashed in the Philippine Sea south of Japan on Wednesday as it flew to the aircraft carrier Ronald Reagan and three people were missing.  “Search and rescue efforts for three personnel continue with U.S. Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships and aircraft on scene,” the U.S. Seventh Fleet said in a news release.  The C-2 has had a good safety record and has not been involved in a fatal accident since 1973 and has been in service for more than fifty years.

 

 

 

North Korea Back On The List As A State Sponsor of Terrorism

I was a bit surprised North Korea was not already on the list of State Sponsors of Terrorism.  President Trump announced on 21 November his administration would redesignate North Korea to this category which carries with it additional sanctions (how many more can there be?).  So, practically speaking this redesignation is more symbolic than practical, as the most serious sanctions have already been put in place, and to date those sanctions have not had the desired effect of persuading North Korea to either abandon or negotiate regarding their nuclear weapons program.  The North spent 20 years on that list before being removed in 2008 by the George W. Bush administration for meeting nuclear inspection requirements. Pyongyang later violated the agreement.  In a speech to the South Korean national assembly two weeks ago, Trump cited atrocities carried out by the Kim regime and called the North “a hell that no person deserves.” Among other acts, Kim’s regime stands accused of carrying out the assassination of his half brother, Kim Jong Nam, with a chemical nerve agent at a Malaysian airport in February.  “Importantly, this is just continuing to point out North Korea’s illicit, unlawful behaviors internationally,” United States Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said at the White House daily briefing Monday. “And we felt it was important to reimpose the designation for that reason.”  Tillerson cited other recent sanctions from the United States and the United Nations on the North and added that the redesignation “continues to tighten the pressure on the Kim regime, all with an intention to have him to understand, ‘This is just going to get worse until you’re ready to come and talk.'”  Iran, Sudan and Syria also are on the list, which is administered by the U.S. Department of State. According to that agency, sanctions for those nations on the list include “restrictions on U.S. foreign assistance; a ban on defense exports and sales; certain controls over exports of dual use items; and miscellaneous financial and other restrictions.”

 

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day November 20th through 22nd, 2017”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day November 7th through 9th 2017

Fireball Rant of Day – The End of the Driving Your Automobile Is In Sight

In the beginning there were no automobiles and there was darkness along the roads.  And man said let us have cars that will move us along the road more efficiently than the horse.  At first man created basic transportation vehicles.  Once two cars were created, they raced them to see which was better.  Man then designed cars to reflect specific needs; functionality combined with beauty and style.  The brothers August and Frederick Duesenberg, Henry Ford , Louis Chevrolet, Ferdinand Porsche,  Enzo Ferrari all designed and built cars to go beyond transportation befitting our dreams of how to drive and what to drive.  I’ve been a car guy all my life.  My first car at age 3 was a pedal car very similar to this photo (below right).  David Dikowski lived two houses down from us.  He had a fire engine pedal car (below left).  We raced each other routinely ‘cause that’s what guys do.   I worn out three sets of tires on that pedal car.  The first car I bought was a tangerine orange ’69 Porsche 911 E Targa.  I purchased it from my high school French teacher, another car guy.  I’ve had Porsche 911’s ever since.  That’s mine below right.  Why?  Because they’re fun to drive; they were built to drive; to drive fast; to take corners with ease; to make a statement; to be the statement.  I’ve also had a couple street rods over the years and as most of you know I’m building a ’31 Chevy 5 Window Coupe.  (photo of a 3 window coupe – not mine) Your imagination and your wallet establish the design parameters for these most personalized vehicles.  Today’s cars are already being homogenized so as to look nearly identical.  They’re either black, white, one of the 50 shades of grey with one red and one blue car per 100 thrown into the mix.  I noted that on 07 November, Waymo, a subsidiary of Google has partnered with several other big name corporations to introduce driverless ride-sharing within the next few months, beginning in Phoenix.  Those partners include: Fiat-Chrysler for minivans, AutoNation for vehicle service, Avis for fleet management and Lyft for their ride-share technology.  Every big name automobile manufacturer is employing all available technology to create driverless ride-share.   It will only be a few years until driverless vehicles are accepted as the norm.  Children born today will never need to obtain that rite of passage – a driver’s license.

When these blob vehicles reach a critical mass of say 75%; governments will say, driverless cars all obey the speed limits all the time, they reduce the number of accidents, cars driven by individuals are responsible for 90% of vehicle accidents; therefore you have five years to cease driving your vehicles on public roads – you may keep them in your own personal museum – under certain qualifying rules of course.  What I see developing is a culture where we can’t and don’t drive.  Vehicles will be owned, operated, maintained by conglomerates.  People will just pay for a service provided ride from point A to B.  The building of great automobiles and the experience of driving those automobiles will be gone forever.  I will be both mad and sad. Comments please!

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day November 7th through 9th 2017”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day October 23 through 29, 2017

Joe Girardi Will Not Return To The Yankees

David Kaplan of ESPN 1000 and NBC Sports Chicago reports that Yankees manager Joe Girardi will not return for the 2018 season.  It was the team’s decision to part ways. Girardi guided a youthful Yankees core to this year’s American League Championship Series, but there had been growing chatter that a change might be coming both before and at various points during that impressive postseason run. Girardi finishes up his 10-year tenure in New York with a 910-710 managerial record and one World Series championship (2009). He’ll be a hot name on the open market if he wants to jump right back into managing somewhere else. There are a few managerial candidates out there.  The Boston Red Sox hired the Houston Astros’ bench coach, Alex Cora, to be their manager on Sunday.  The Red Sox announced the hire a day after the Astros eliminated the Yankees in the American League Championship Series. With two days off before Houston opened the World Series against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Boston had a chance to hire Cora without running afoul of Major League Baseball’s ban on major moves during the Series.  He may end up being a good manager, but he has no managerial experience.  While there are some people who speculate he should have been a leading candidate for the job, I disagree.  You can’t come to the Yankees with no experience.  I like Don Mattingly for the job, but the Yankees will have to hire him away from the total rebuilding effort planned for Derek Jeter’s Miami Marlins.   Mattingly served as captain of the Yankees from 1991 through 1995.  Returning to the Yankees as a coach in 2004 for manager Joe Torre, he followed Torre to the Dodgers in 2008, and succeeded him as the Dodgers’ manager in 2011. The Dodgers and Mattingly mutually parted ways after the 2015 season, and he became manager of the Miami Marlins.  “Donnie Baseball” – where would you rather be – Yankees of Marlins?

 

 

World Series – Games 2, 3 and 4

A great comeback in the second game of the World Series on October 25th.by the Houston Astros to win the game in Los Angeles tying the Series

at one game apiece.  The great Vin Scully was in the audience and  I was reminded of another great World Series game finish in 1986, when  with one strike from defeat, the Mets tie the game on a wild pitch and then, thanks to Red Sox’s Bill Buckner’s error (let the ball go through his legs) (below right), win Game 6, knotted the Fall Classic at three games apiece. This event was selected as one of baseball’s 30 most baseball memorable moments.  “If one picture is worth a thousand words, you have seen about a million words, but more than that, you have seen an absolutely bizarre finish to Game 6 of the 1986 World Series.” – Vin Scully, describing the aftermath of the play after a long silence.  And of course the Mets went on to beat the Red Sox.  Game three showed the value once again of home field.  A good back and forth game with the Astros prevailing.  Game 4 was moving along with some really good pitching as you would expect until the eighth inning and then the train came off the tracks.  The Dodger’s first baseman Cody Bellinger‘s struggled through the first three games of the World Series. He went 0-for-4 with four strikeouts in Game 3, which ran his hitless streak up to 11 at-bats in the Fall Classic. Bellinger turned his fortune around in Game 4, helping the Dodgers even the World Series at two games apiece with a 6-1 victory at Minute Maid Park.  And we’re tied at two games apiece going into tonight’s game at publishing time.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day October 23 through 29, 2017”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day September 23 through 26, 2017

Friends of FOD

A lot of FOD to pick up.  Comments welcomed of course.

 

Hurricane Maria Relief Efforts

We’re just beginning to grasp the scope of the devastation to Puerto Rico.  This American territory has been holding on by a thread for years and has been on the verge of bankruptcy several times.  Its infrastructure was already substandard and in need of major overhaul prior to Maria.  Military Times is reporting, two U.S. Navy ships, National Guard, Air National Guard, Reserve troops and Army helicopters are providing aid to Puerto Rico. But questions are mounting over whether the U.S. is doing enough for its territory and people, who are American citizens.  To date, the amphibious assault ship Kearsarge and dock landing ship Oak Hill have “conducted eight medical evacuations, 148 airlifts and delivered 44,177 [pounds] of relief supplies and cargo to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands,” U.S. Northern Command said in a statement.  U.S. forces have also restored a mobile communications tower at St. Thomas International Airport to enable the airport to receive additional aircraft to evacuate residents.  The amphibious assault ship Wasp has been conducting similar rescues in Dominica, but that ship will be departing the region to head to the Pacific, where it will eventually relieve the Bonhomme Richard, a Navy official said.  Approximately 2,600 U.S. military personnel and National Guard members are currently involved in Hurricane Maria relief efforts, the Pentagon said.  Currently, more than 700 Air National Guard airmen are deployed to Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico to support relief efforts.  Most of Puerto Rico has no electricity or cell phone capabilities because of Hurricane Maria’s damage to the electrical grid and cell towers. There are long lines for food and water.  Likely we’ll need to do more and the more is likely to continue for years.

 

 

 

USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain Take Another Top Officer

The Commander of the  U.S. Pacific Fleet is retiring after learning there’s no possibility of him being promoted out of his current job, he said in a statement to NBC News on Monday. Admiral Scott H. Swift was in charge of the Pacific Fleet during the period this summer when two different ships, USS John S. McCain (DDG-56) and the USS Fitzgerald (DDG-62) sustained collisions at sea that left 17 sailors dead.  Swift said the Chief of Naval Operations  Admiral John M. Richardson told him that he would not be nominated for the United States Pacific Command post, which is senior to Pacific Fleet.  In a statement, he said he was retiring “with great appreciation and gratitude for the honor of having served so many Sailors and their families for what will be 40 years in January.”

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day September 23 through 26, 2017”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 28 through 31, 2017

 

Marines and Navy Heading to Gulf Coast For Possible Disaster Relief

In the wake of the ever increasing destruction caused by Hurricane Harvey, the Marine Times is reporting, nearly 700 Marines will head toward the Gulf Coast Thursday aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge in case they are tasked with helping rescue Texas residents who have been slammed by historic flooding caused by Hurricane Harvey.  The Kearsarge and the dock landing ship Oak Hill are both scheduled to get underway from ports in Virginia, Fleet Forces Command announced on Wednesday.  “These ships are capable of providing medical support, maritime civil affairs, maritime security, expeditionary logistic support, medium and heavy lift air support, and bring a diverse capability including assessment and security,” a news release from the command says. The Marines will also be able to purify water, distribute relief supplies, conduct aerial reconnaissance and provide engineering capabilities, a II MEF news release says.  “Marines conduct regular training and have gained real-world experience with Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief from relief efforts across the globe,” the news release says.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 28 through 31, 2017”