FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day September 15th through 17th 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

When a man sits with a pretty girl it seems like a minute. But when that man sits on a hot stove for a minute – it seems longer than an hour.  That’s relativity.  – Albert Einstein

FOD Trivia Question

What is the name given to the heat used to turn a liquid into a gas or a liquid into a solid rather than to raise temperature?   Guesses?  Comments?  Is anyone out there?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

Only one town in the US bears the official name of Beach.  In what state in Beach located?  Answer – North Dakota

 

Free Beer In Cleveland – Not Yet

Back in the 12 through 15 August 2018 edition of FOD I revealed there would be free beer in Cleveland – as soon as the Cleveland Browns won a football game.   Bud Light put “victory fridges” with 200-300 bottles of beer in spots around Cleveland that will remain locked until the Browns win a game.  Should that happen, a wireless signal will unlock the fridges and any people of age will be able to drink to their team’s long-awaited win.  That beer is aging as the Browns lost again this week, this time to the New Orleans Saints.  I didn’t watch the game, I only checked the score.  The beer could age out and will need to be rotated out of those “victory fridges” before Cleveland wins a game.  I don’t think it’s worth a trip to Cleveland however, after all – it’s Bud Light.  It’s not even boat beer!

 

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FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day September 9th through 14th 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

Begin procrastination early.  It will give you more time to reconsider it later on!  And today I thought I would offer this anecdote.  You have to be of a certain age to appreciate it.  When Jack Benny was invited to visit the White House, he was stopped by the Secret Service guard and asked what was in the violin case he was carrying?  “A machine gun,” Benny replied with a straight face.  The Secret Service guard with an equally straight face said, “Oh, okay.  I thought for a moment it was your violin.”

 

FOD Trivia Question

Only one town in the US bears the official name of Beach.  In what state in Beach located?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

What fastening material was born from the inspiration of inventor George DeMestral after he returned from a walk in the 1950’s and noticed his jacket covered with cockleburs?  Answer:  Velcro

 

Hurricane Florence

A year ago I was at Carolina Beach and the greater Wilmington, NC area.  Let’s send some good prayers and thoughts to all those affected by Hurricane Florence.  I’ve heard so much about storm surge and how it’s affected by winds and tides.  This storm is moving so slowly, it will dump tremendous amounts of rain on all those inland rivers and we’ll likely see some major flooding in the region.  There will be dozens of rescues over the next days, mostly those who should have departed days ago.

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day September 9th through 14th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 28th through September 4th 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

Dress like JFK; speak like Hemingway; work like Henry Ford; party like Gatsby!

 

FOD Trivia Question

What is the separation of metals from ore by the melting of metals using high amounts of energy.  For example, converting iron oxide to metallic iron by heating is called ____.

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

What 15th century mathematician, physicist, and astronomer who is said to have set the Renaissance’s scientific revolution in motion, pulling modern science out of a magician’s hat of speculative natural philosophy? Answer: Galileo Galilei

 

Senator John McCain Buried at Naval Academy Cemetery

This past week I attended my reunion at the US Naval Academy.  It was mostly an opportunity to get together with old friends I don’t converse with enough.  It just happened to coincide with the burial of Senator John McCain and reflects well on the friendships we share.  According to Navy Times, his final journey ended Sunday on a grassy hill at the U.S. Naval Academy within view of the Severn River and earshot of midshipmen present and future, and alongside a lifelong friend.  (the burial site is very close to the Hospital Point athletic fields.)  A horse-drawn caisson carrying the senator’s casket led a procession of mourners from the academy’s chapel to its cemetery following a private service. The senator’s widow, Cindy, and his children were among those who walked behind the caisson. Joining them were family and friends as well as members of McCain’s Class of 1958, military leaders and academy midshipmen.  About 1600 a flyover of military aircraft honored the Navy pilot who was shot down over Vietnam and held more than five years as a prisoner of war. The burial was private as per the wishes of McCain, the Arizona Republican and 2008 presidential nominee died Aug. 25 from brain cancer at age 81. One scheduled speaker at the service, Sen. Lindsey Graham, said before the service that he would tell the audience that “nobody loved a soldier more than John McCain, that I bear witness to his commitment to have their back, travel where they go, never let them be forgotten.” Also he expected to pay tribute were David Petraeus, a retired general and former CIA director, and McCain’s son Jack.  As the hearse carrying McCain passed through a gate and into the academy, there was loud applause from the several hundred people lining the street outside on the hot and muggy summer day. Many held their hands over their hearts and waved American flags. Some shouted, “God bless you.”  People in the crowd held signs that read “Senator John McCain Thanks For Serving! Godspeed” and “Rest In Peace Maverick.”  For his final resting place, McCain picked the historic site overlooking the Severn River, not Arlington National Cemetery, where his father and grandfather, both admirals, are buried.  Years ago Chuck Larson, an admiral himself and an ally throughout McCain’s life, reserved four plots at the cemetery — two for McCain and himself, and two for their wives, now widows. Larson died in 2014, and McCain wrote in a recent memoir that he wanted to be buried next to his friend, “near where it began.”  Among the pallbearers on a list provided by McCain’s office were Frank Gamboa, his academy roommate; Defense Secretary Jim Mattis; and two men who were POWs with McCain in Vietnam, John Fer and Everett Alvarez Jr.  Tributes to McCain began Wednesday in Arizona and continued for the remainder of the week. On Saturday, speeches by his daughter Meghan and two former presidents — Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Barack Obama — remembered McCain as a patriot who could bridge painful rivalries. While their remarks made clear their admiration for him, they also represented a repudiation of President Donald Trump’s brand of tough-talking, divisive politics. Trump and McCain were at odds during the 2016 campaign and for much of Trump’s presidency.  “There’s a lesson to be learned this week about John McCain,” said Graham, R-S.C.  “No. 1, Americans appreciate military service. … If you work hard and do your homework and know what you’re talking about, people will listen to you. That if you pick big causes bigger than yourself, you’ll be remembered,” he told “Fox News Sunday.”  “He tried to drain the swamp before it was cool, that you can fight hard and still be respected. If you forgive, people appreciate it, and if you admit to mistakes, you look good as a stronger man. That’s the formula, John McCain. This was a civics lesson for anybody who wanted to listen. Why do we remember this man? Because of the way he conducted his public life.”

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FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 22nd through 27th 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

When a man assumes a public trust, he should consider himself as public property. – Thomas Jefferson

 

FOD Trivia Question

What 15th century mathematician, physicist, and astronomer who is said to have set the Renaissance’s scientific revolution in motion, pulling modern science out of a magician’s hat of speculative natural philosophy?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

The first inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt as the 32nd President of the United States was held on Saturday, March 4, 1933.  After taking the oath of office, Roosevelt proceeded to deliver his 1,883-word, 20 minute-long inaugural address, best known for his famously pointed reference to “fear itself” in one of its first lines:  So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. And I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days. The phrase “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” is actually paraphrased from an earlier adage: “Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.”  This was originally penned in 1841 by what famous nature-loving philosopher and author?  Answer – Henry David Thoreau.

 

 

Senator John McCain Will Rest Where His Service To Our Nation Began

According to Military Times Sen. John McCain’s service to his country began more than six decades ago at the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis (Class of ’58) and will end there in a cemetery overlooking Maryland’s Severn River.  A private burial service next Sunday will conclude nearly a week of events honoring the Navy aviator, prisoner of war, congressman, longtime senator and presidential contender. The Arizona Republican died of brain cancer Saturday at 81 at his ranch near Sedona.  McCain will lie in state in the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix on August 29 (McCain’s birthday), followed by a service at North Phoenix Baptist Church on August 30. His body will travel to Washington to lie in state in the rotunda of the United States Capitol on August 31, before a service at the Washington National Cathedral on September 1. He was a “lifelong Episcopalian” who attended, but did not join, a Southern Baptist church for at least 17 years; memorial services were scheduled in both denominations.  He will be buried at the United States Naval Academy Cemetery, next to his Naval Academy classmate Admiral Charles R. Larson.  Tributes were widely given on social media, including from Congressional colleagues, all living former Presidents – Jimmy CarterGeorge H. W. BushBill ClintonGeorge W. BushBarack Obama – and former Vice President Joe Biden, as well as Vice President Mike Pence.  Colonel Trần Trọng Duyệt, who ran the Hỏa Lò Prison when McCain was held there, remarked “At that time I liked him personally for his toughness and strong stance. Later on, when he became a US Senator, he and Senator John Kerry greatly contributed to promote [Vietnam]-US relations so I was very fond of him. When I learnt about his death early this morning, I feel very sad. I would like to send condolences to his family.”  Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) announced that he would introduce a resolution to rename the Russell Senate Office Building after McCain.  His family’s military tradition extends to the latest generation: son John Sidney IV (“Jack”) graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 2009, becoming the fourth generation John S. McCain to do so, and is a helicopter pilot; son James served two tours with the Marines in the Iraq War; and son Doug flew jets in the Navy. President Donald Trump was not expected to attend any of the services. McCain had long feuded with Trump, and two White House officials said McCain’s family had asked, before the senator’s death, that Trump not attend services. Vice President Mike Pence is likely to attend, said the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe private discussions.  Trump noted the senator’s death in a tweet Saturday: “My deepest sympathies and respect go out to the family of Senator John McCain. Our hearts and prayers are with you!” First lady Melania Trump tweeted thanks to McCain for his service to the country.  Bush and Obama had been McCain’s political opponents, too, blocking his White House ambitions in 2000 and 2008, respectively. “These were bitter contests, both of them,” Senator Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., said Sunday on CBS’ “Face the Nation,” and “to ask them to speak at your funeral, and for them to be honored at the opportunity, that tells you all you need to know.”  One of McCain’s long-serving Senate colleagues, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Sunday, “The nation mourns the loss of a great American patriot, a statesman who put his country first and enriched this institution through many years of service.”  Senator McCain penned a farewell message before he died that appears to take thinly veiled shots at President Donald Trump for fanning the flames of “tribal rivalries” and hiding “behind walls.”  The moving message, a personal tribute to America and its people, was read to the public Monday by Rick Davis, a close friend of McCain’s and the national campaign manager of the Arizona Republican’s 2008 and 2000 presidential campaigns.  Speaking of country’s best qualities, McCain wrote that “we weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all corners of the globe.”  “We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been,” Davis, holding back tears, said as he read McCain’s message in Phoenix.  “Do not despair of our present difficulties but believe always in the promise and greatness of America, because nothing is inevitable here,” McCain wrote. “Americans never quit. We never surrender. We never hide from history. We make history.”  “To be connected to America’s causes — liberty, equal justice, respect for the dignity of all people — brings happiness more sublime than life’s fleeting pleasures,” McCain wrote. “Our identities and sense of worth are not circumscribed but enlarged by serving good causes bigger than ourselves.  “‘Fellow Americans’ — that association has meant more to me than any other. I lived and died a proud American.”

Continue reading “FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 22nd through 27th 2018”

FOD Fireball’s Observations of the Day August 16th through 21st 2018

FOD Saying of the Day

I learned years ago, never wrestle with a pig.  You both get dirty and the besides, the pig likes it.  – George Bernard Shaw

 

FOD Trivia Question

The first inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt as the 32nd President of the United States was held on Saturday, March 4, 1933.  After taking the oath of office, Roosevelt proceeded to deliver his 1,883-word, 20 minute-long inaugural address, best known for his famously pointed reference to “fear itself” in one of its first lines:  So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is…fear itself — nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance. In every dark hour of our national life a leadership of frankness and of vigor has met with that understanding and support of the people themselves which is essential to victory. And I am convinced that you will again give that support to leadership in these critical days. The phrase “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself,” is actually paraphrased from an earlier adage: “Nothing is so much to be feared as fear.”  This was originally penned in 1841 by what famous nature-loving philosopher and author?

 

Previous FOD Trivia Answer

Who said, “My wife and I were happy for 20 years.  And then we met.”  Answer:  Rodney Dangerfield.

 

 

President and Pentagon Postpone Parade

Maybe smarter heads have prevailed.  Military Times is reporting that on Thursday evening (August 16), the Pentagon announced that President Donald J. Trump’s military parade through the nation’s capital will be postponed until 2019.  Department of Defense spokesman Col. Rob Manning told reporters that both the military and White House “have now agreed to explore opportunities in 2019,” delaying the Nov. 10 parade championed by the president to honor the troops and commemorate the centennial of World War I.  No makeup date for the procession has been scheduled but the Pentagon move came hours after The Associated Press and other media outlets reported that military officials pegged the price tag for Trump’s event at $92 million.  That’s at least three times higher than what White House budget director Mick Mulvaney told lawmakers it would cost during Capitol Hill testimony on Feb. 14.  Citing anonymous Pentagon sources, the AP reported that parade planners needed about $50 million to fund aircraft flyovers, equipment, personnel and other expenses. Other agencies would combine to pay a $42 million tab for other expenditures, mostly security along a parade route winding from the White House to the Capitol.  Secretary of Defense James Mattis, a retired Marine four-star general, had defended the parade by saying it arose from Trump’s genuine affection for the armed forces.  (Fireball note:  What the hell does that mean?  I’m sure we could find a better place to spent $92M.)  But many troops privately grumbled about being dragooned to march during what traditionally has been a four-day weekend away from their military duties.  Critics also lambasted the administration for spending tens of millions of dollars on the November spectacle after Trump canceled military maneuvers with South Korea partly because they would cost “a tremendous amount of money,” a sum the military later estimated at $14 million.  Others had questioned whether the procession would resemble the military marches favored by dictators such as North Korea’s strongman Kim Jong-un, who told Trump during nuclear talks that he considered America’s war games with Seoul to be provocative.  But supporters of Trump’s parade pointed to similar celebrations in democracies such as France’s Bastille Day procession.  (Fireball note:  Hey it’s France – it doesn’t count.)  Eyeing Paris, Trump had said that his administration was “going to have to try and top it” in November.  Military support for events in the capital isn’t unusual. More than 5,000 troops from the Army, Air Force, Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard, including reserve and National Guard personnel, supported Trump’s inauguration on Jan. 20, 2017.  A Department of Defense memo released in March revealed that the president’s November celebration would feature a “heavy air component” but “wheeled vehicles only, no tanks” because of concerns the treads would chew up the capital’s roadways.  That happened in 1991, when Washington officials held a parade to honor troops home from the war in Iraq.  On Thursday, most veterans organizations remained silent about the parade’s postponement, but two groups took to Twitter to praise the decision.  “The American Legion appreciates that our President wants to show in a dramatic fashion our nation’s support for our troops,” National Commander Denise Rohan said. “However, until such time as we can celebrate victory in the War on Terrorism and bring our military home, we think the parade money would be better spent fully funding the Department of Veteran Affairs and giving our troops and their families the best care possible.”  Will C. Fischer, the director of government relations for the left-leaning Vote Vets, added that his group “always felt that blowing millions, and wasting the military’s time, so Trump could feel like a big authoritarian, was a bad idea. We will continue to oppose this parade, if it ever arises again.”  (Fireball note: Thanks for your continued opposition.).

 

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